minor life update:

Apologies for not being around, my hard drive decided to die quite spectacularly (on my birthday, no less!) and so I’ve been internet-less for some time now. Now, however, I am one year older, I have imbibed a suitable amount of birthday cocktails, spent time with a lot of lovely people, and more importantly, have a new working laptop. Please catch me up on what’s been happening, Tumblr!

Autumnal bibliomania is the best kind of bibliomania.

Autumnal bibliomania is the best kind of bibliomania.

(Source: girlyme, via bookporn)


If the rain must fall... by (Corrie) | Website

If the rain must fall... by (Corrie) | Website

(Source: R2--D2, via themountainblues)

(Source: edhellenardanya, via akitla)

purplefigtree:

Venice, as rendered by Ottoman admiral and cartographer Piri Reis in his Kitab-i Bahriye, a book of portolan charts and sailing directions produced in the early 16th century.

purplefigtree:

Venice, as rendered by Ottoman admiral and cartographer Piri Reis in his Kitab-i Bahriye, a book of portolan charts and sailing directions produced in the early 16th century.

(Source: roxygen, via cinquespotted)

explore-blog:

October 1, 1847: Pioneering astronomer Maria Mitchell, a rocking woman in science, discovers the famed comet C/1847TI, known today as Miss Mitchell’s Comet – a heartening story of misfortune made right by the collective integrity of the scientific community. 

explore-blog:

October 1, 1847: Pioneering astronomer Maria Mitchell, a rocking woman in science, discovers the famed comet C/1847TI, known today as Miss Mitchell’s Comet – a heartening story of misfortune made right by the collective integrity of the scientific community

(Source: )

"Fiction is art and art is the triumph over chaos… to celebrate a world that lies spread out around us like a bewildering and stupendous dream."

— John Cheever (via booklover)

leanin:

What would have once sounded like a far-fetched feminist fantasy – women forming the majority of a parliament – is a reality in one country in the world, Rwanda.
In fact, women are making gains throughout all of Africa, but these achievements have been met with a loud silence from the western feminist movement. 
African women are blazing a feminist trail - why don’t we hear their voices? (The Guardian) 

I remember reading a long time ago that UNESCO advocates 30% women in government because that’s the critical mass for passing social issues, such as those concerning women’s rights, healthcare, childcare, etc., and the only country to make it over that threshold in the last couple of decades is Rwanda - but even prior to massive population changes they weren’t that far off that goal. To quote the article:
'Early reports from the parliamentary elections last Monday [in Rwanda] indicate that women now hold nearly 64% of the seats. Prior to the genocidal conflict in 1994, the figure was just 18%.’
18% PRIOR to the genocide? In 2013, Britain has about 20% women in government, and it’s going down. Bloody hell…
'Female activists made a conscious effort to include women in the rebuilding of the country after the genocide. In other words, what we see is not simply a consequence of the conflict or big-hearted male leaders handing out seats to women. It is a conscious and co-ordinated effort, by women for women.’
Go read the article, it’s excellent and important and deserves attention.

leanin:

What would have once sounded like a far-fetched feminist fantasy – women forming the majority of a parliament – is a reality in one country in the world, Rwanda.

In fact, women are making gains throughout all of Africa, but these achievements have been met with a loud silence from the western feminist movement. 

African women are blazing a feminist trail - why don’t we hear their voices? (The Guardian) 

I remember reading a long time ago that UNESCO advocates 30% women in government because that’s the critical mass for passing social issues, such as those concerning women’s rights, healthcare, childcare, etc., and the only country to make it over that threshold in the last couple of decades is Rwanda - but even prior to massive population changes they weren’t that far off that goal. To quote the article:

'Early reports from the parliamentary elections last Monday [in Rwanda] indicate that women now hold nearly 64% of the seats. Prior to the genocidal conflict in 1994, the figure was just 18%.’

18% PRIOR to the genocide? In 2013, Britain has about 20% women in government, and it’s going down. Bloody hell…

'Female activists made a conscious effort to include women in the rebuilding of the country after the genocide. In other words, what we see is not simply a consequence of the conflict or big-hearted male leaders handing out seats to women. It is a conscious and co-ordinated effort, by women for women.’

Go read the article, it’s excellent and important and deserves attention.

(via fuckyeahfeminists)

iamjapanese:

Piero Pizzi Cannella(Italian, b.1955)
Cattedrale     

iamjapanese:

Piero Pizzi Cannella(Italian, b.1955)

Cattedrale     

(via cinquespotted)

reachabovethetrees:

nevver:

The Healing Power of Cat Purrs [infographic]

Cattttttt

Thank you, science, for justifying my crazy cat ladyness.

maptitude1:

Here are more anagram maps from the Basement Geographer, these two of North and South America. I especially like “Silky Lactate” for Salt Lake City, and how Denver is on there despite not having an anagram.

This is bloody excellent.

(via fuckyeahcartography)

camfoc:

In Italy you may find antique books in the garbage.

This book was rescued from a garbage dump in Montecchio Emilia, northern Italy.

It’s the 2nd part of a “Mahazor ke-minhag Benè Roma" (prayer book according to the ancient Italian Jewish rituals) published in Venice in 1626 by the printers Pietro, Alvise e Lorenzo Bragadin.

(via teacoffeebooks)

englishsnow:

rainy autumn in Poland by Erik Witsoe

(via knittedleaves)

I really love spiders, because they’re not only beautiful to watch, but they leave behind such perfect webs.

I really love spiders, because they’re not only beautiful to watch, but they leave behind such perfect webs.

(Source: omniaobscura, via armchairoxfordscholar)